Lactic Acid vs. Lactate

Let’s say you run as fast as you can for a minute. The first 10 seconds or so are pretty easy, but then you can’t run as fast anymore. With each passing moment your muscles burn a little more, and your speed slows. What’s happening?

We’ll start with those first 10 seconds that were relatively easy, when your speed was fastest. The first one or two seconds were fueled by the ATP stored within your muscles. Then the next five seconds were primarily fueled by your phosphagen system, which is stored phosphocreatine (PC) within your muscles. So those first seven seconds came from a combination of ATP and PC, and that’s why it’s sometimes called the ATP-PC system, instead of the phosphagen system. Different name, same thing.

Before we move on, it’s worth noting here that even though the phosphagen system is typically described as lasting 10 seconds, in reality it can last up to 30 seconds, depending on the athlete and his/her previous training.

Enter Anaerobic Glycolysis
You know that you can’t run at your top speed, or perform a maximum isometric hold, for more than 10 seconds before things start heading south. That’s because your body’s quickest, “cleanest” energy source, the phosphagen system, has been taken over by your next quickest source for energy: glucose.

How does the body get energy from glucose? Let’s briefly cover a little biochemistry.

The foundation of the glucose molecule is a six-carbon structure. Those six carbons are split into two, three-carbon molecules, which are pyruvate. So anaerobic glycolysis consists of splitting one glucose molecule into two pyruvate molecules.

This splitting forms two adenosine triphosphate (i.e., 2 ATPs), which the body uses to make energy. Importantly, splitting glucose into pyruvate is fueled by NAD+. You might not be familiar with NAD+ but it’s essential for life and present in every cell of your body. After fueling the split, NAD+ turns into NADH. Importantly, glycolysis also releases an acidic proton (H+). The importance of this will make sense shortly, so hang with me.

Anaerobic glycolysis takes place in the sarcoplasm, the muscle’s gel-like substance that includes all of its components, except for the mitochondria.

Enter Lactate
So now you know that splitting glucose (i.e., anaerobic glycolysis) results in the formation of pyruvate and NADH. If you’re wondering what those molecules have to do with lactate, here’s your answer: Pyruvate and NADH are what form lactate. But for this to happen the enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase, is required.

Enzyme reactions work like a lock-and-key mechanism. In this case, the “lock” is lactate dehydrogenase, while the “keys” are pyruvate and NADH. Once those keys are inside the lock, NADH donates its proton to pyruvate. This transforms NADH into NAD+ and pyruvate into lactate.

Importantly, pyruvate consumes an acidic proton (H+) from the muscle during this reaction. Therefore, the formation of lactate is alkalizing to the muscle. Indeed, if it weren’t for the formation of lactate, your muscles would become even more acidic, as shown below.

What Happened to Lactic Acid?
Before we move on, you probably noticed that there’s been no talk of lactic acid. That’s because there’s very good research that demonstrates lactic acid isn’t formed in muscle, at all. You can find that research here and here and here. In a nutshell, lactic acid was discovered in the 1770’s by a scientist that was researching sour milk. Since it has a mildly acidic flavor, and can function as a preservative, lactic acid was later added to foods, as well as brewing and flavoring beer.

More About Lactate
Lactate is everyone’s favorite scapegoat. It’s been blamed for everything from the painful “muscle burn” to fatigue to muscle soreness. It’s not directly responsible for any of those things. In fact, lactate can be used to fuel muscle contractions, which keeps your efforts going. It can also be sent to the liver where it’s converted to glucose (i.e., gluconeogenesis), and then sent back to the muscle to continue with anaerobic glycolysis.

So lactate is your friend, but he hangs around with shady characters. The problem with lactate is that it’s always accompanied by protons (H+), even though it consumes one during each lactate dehydrogenase reaction. Proton accumulation is actually due to the breakdown of ATP (i.e., ATP hydrolysis) in muscle. When muscles are contracting intensely they require a lot of energy from the breakdown of ATP. This causes a huge release of protons (H+) within the muscle, but the lactate dehydrogenase reaction can’t consume enough of those protons to offset the acidity (i.e., metabolic acidosis).

That proton accumulation is what causes “muscle burn” and nausea since the pH of the muscle and blood are decreasing (i.e., becoming more acidic). Protons also decrease the speed and force of your muscle contractions. Therefore, lactate is guilty by association.

This is why scientists study the rate that lactate increases during intense exercise. The measurement gives them an idea of how much H+ is being accumulated. Because if lactate is increasing, so are protons.

The point where lactate starts to rise rapidly is the lactate threshold. As this level gets higher, your speed and power drop off substantially. Therefore, the goal of any good strength and conditioning program is to train your athletes to sustain more speed and power before hitting their lactate threshold (you can find the general training parameters in my last blog). The following graph gives you a visual of what I’m talking about.

So now you know a little bit more about lactate, and why H+ accumulation should be avoided to keep your power running strong. Speaking of power, my latest book Powerful Mobility is now available on Amazon for only $9.99.

Want some more scientific info about lactate? Check out this research.

Stay Focused,
CW

Attention trainers: Do you want to take your income and skill set to the next level? Check out my 10-week online Corrective Exercise Specialist certification course I designed for the International Sports Sciences Association (ISSA). Click the image below for more info…

 

Want to build muscle and strength fast? Here’s my best system to do it:

(Note: this article has been modified since it was originally posted on 9/20/2017.)

Is Tabata Ideal to Build Endurance?

In the 1990s, two landmark research papers were released that drastically shifted how athletes and fitness enthusiasts train for endurance.

In 1994, Prof. Angelo Tremblay’s research demonstrated that endurance exercise performed with alternating bouts of high- and low-intensity resulted in better fat loss than continuous low-intensity exercise did.

Then in 1996, research by Prof. Izumi Tabata tested a protocol that consisted of 20 seconds of maximal activity, followed by 10 seconds of rest for 8 rounds. It was a gruesome four minutes for the athletes in the study. This Tabata protocol was compared to traditional lower-intensity endurance exercise performed for 60 minutes straight. At the end of the study, the continuous lower-intensity exercise group only improved their aerobic capacity. However, athletes that did the Tabata protocol increased both their aerobic and anaerobic capacity.

These two studies have been often quoted as “proof” that high intensity interval training (HIIT) is better than longer, slower cardio for improving fat loss and overall endurance.

Now, assuming you’ve tried HIIT using plenty of effort, you know that it quickly acidifies your body. Your muscles burn, and nausea can set in fast. This is not due to lactate, a substance that actually helps muscle contractions. It’s due to the accumulation of acidic protons (H+), which happens when the body starts burning a lot of glucose to make energy from glycolysis. With a higher effort and intensity, more glucose will be used, and subsequently, more H+ will be produced. This is how metabolic acidosis occurs.

There are two potential problems with making your body use more glucose for energy. First, you’ll gas out quicker than if you used fat to produce energy. When you see a boxer lose his energy and coordination in later rounds, he’s primarily using glucose, not fat, for fuel. A lean athlete has enough stored fat to fuel a jog that lasts for many days. Second, and maybe most importantly, we don’t yet know what negative impacts can occur from forcing the body into metabolic acidosis multiple times per week.

Enter Pavel Tsatsouline
Many of you will know Pavel Tsatsouline, chairman of StrongFirst, as one of the world’s top experts in building strength and flexibility. What you probably don’t know is that Pavel has spent the last three years immersed in endurance training research. His ability to read Russian gives him an advantage since some of the best endurance research has come from there.

Pavel and I have had many discussions over these last three years as he was perusing endurance research from around the globe. In those discussions, he effectively made the case for why many of the popular high-intensity endurance protocols aren’t ideal. Therefore, over the last year I’ve shifted my approach to building endurance with athletes. The results have been extremely impressive, which I’ll discuss more in future blogs.

I got to see Pavel publicly present his immense research for the first time this summer in Denver. His sold-out Strong Endurance seminar attracted some of the heaviest hitters in the fields of strength, conditioning, and physical therapy.

Pavel started off the seminar by warning us not to “chase the proton.” The acidosis that accompanies proton accumulation can lead to many problems that negatively affect power, health and performance. He went on to tell us that world-renowned Russian sports scientist, Prof. Yuri Verkhoshansky, figured this out many decades ago, dating back to 1980. In 1988, Verkhoshansky wrote this about his “anti-glycolytic” training:

“[Yet] the goal is not taking the athlete to exhaustion to accustom him to metabolic acidosis, as it is often understood in athletic practice, but just the opposite…to develop alactic power and to couple it with oxidative phosphorylation, to increase the muscles oxidative qualities, this is develop the local muscle endurance.”

What Should You Do?
The approach to building endurance without overemphasizing glycolysis is beyond the scope of this blog. However, there are two things to keep in mind when you work to build endurance.

1. Build your phosphagen system: Your muscles immediate source of energy comes from stored ATP and the ATP-CP system. They will fuel your maximum effort and speed exercises for 6-12 seconds. This means you can either do low-rep sets of strength exercises or high-speed work for 6-12 seconds. Give yourself enough rest to return your heart rate close to what it was at the beginning of the set to offset H+ accumulation.

2. Train endurance at your anaerobic threshold: If you perform endurance work in the anaerobic zone your muscles will need more oxygen than they can get, and this causes H+ and carbon dioxide (CO2) to accumulate. Both of these factors can increase metabolic acidosis. Dr. Philip Maffetone, author of The Big Book of Endurance Training and Racing, recommends training at a heart rate that’s around 180-your age. Therefore, a 30-year old athlete would perform his sport and endurance work around 150 beats per minute, allowing him to use fat for fuel and minimize acidosis. Over time he’ll be able to perform faster and faster at that heart rate.

This approach follows what Pavel told us all in his Strong Endurance seminar, “Increase your 100% and learn to use a lower percentage of it.”

Stay Focused,
CW

P.S. Click the image below to find out more about my 10-week Corrective Exercise certification course I designed for the International Sports Sciences Association (ISSA):

Ultimate Glute Development

Everyone wants better glutes, whether you’re a guy or gal, athlete or non-athlete. That’s because glutes that are awesomely developed not only make your body look better, but they can also drastically improve your performance. When the glutes are strengthened and built using the correct combinations of exercises, you’ll run faster, jump higher and improve the strength of all your lower-body lifts.

In order to build a muscle to it’s highest level of size and performance, all of its fibers should be recruited by the end of a workout. The glutes are a tri-planar muscle, which means it can function in all three planes of movement:

  • Sagittal plane = hip extension
  • Frontal plane = hip abduction
  • Transverse plane = hip external rotation

The problem is that most people only train the sagittal plane function of the glutes: hip extension. I’m talking here about the typical squat, deadlift and lunge variations.

Last fall I spent four months working with Christopher Powers, Ph.D., at his Movement Performance Institute (a glute-focused sports medicine facility if there ever was one). I worked with athletes and non-athletes that had a myriad of knee, low back or hip problems.

The early stages of Professor Powers’ system focuses heavily on strengthening the glutes in the frontal and transverse planes – hip abduction and hip external rotation, respectively. Pure hip extension isn’t usually trained until about 6 weeks into the system.

There were two key observations I made after training athletes primarily in hip abduction and external rotation for up to 6 weeks straight:

  • Their glutes got substantially larger
  • Their hip extension strength increased

Their glutes got bigger because they were recruiting muscle fibers that perform hip abduction and external rotation, which had been neglected in the gym from doing nothing but squats, lunges and deadlifts.

Prof. Powers has been a pioneer in research that demonstrates a link between frequent glute activation and a stronger mind-muscle connection, which is an essential component of strength and hypertrophy development. So even though pure hip extension wasn’t trained, that movement got stronger because the brain was better able to recruit the entire gluteal fibers in any future task.

My point here is that ultimate glute development requires a strong emphasis on hip abduction and hip external rotation. Those two movement planes must be frequently trained in order to build the glutes to the highest level of size and performance.

Test Yourself

Before you watch the video where I outline my favorite 7-minute glute-building sequence, test yourself (or one of your clients).

  • Stiff hamstrings? Do a standing toe touch assessment, then perform the glute sequence and immediately retest it.
  • Knee or low back pain? Do a movement which causes you to feel the discomfort, then perform the glute sequence and immediately retest it.
  • Need to improve your squat, lunge, deadlift, sprint or vertical jump? Do the following sequence twice each day for 2 weeks, then retest the exercise you’re trying to improve. Your performance will definitely go up!

The following Ultimate Glute Development sequence requires a mini-band. I use the bands made by Perform Better, which can be found at this Amazon link. Most females should start with a yellow mini-band; males can start with a green. The key is to progress the band tension as your strength improves.

  • Goal for males: perform the entire Ultimate Glute Development sequence with a black Perform Better mini-band.
  • Goal for females: perform the entire Ultimate Glute Development sequence with a blue Perform Better mini-band.

Here’s the Ultimate Glute Development sequence, a collection of my favorite glute-building exercises, all crammed into a 7-minute drill. Do this sequence at least once per day (preferably twice), at the beginning of your regular workouts or as a stand-alone drill.

I highly recommend you make this a foundational activation sequence for you and your clients, for years to come.

Stay Focused,
CW

How to Run Without Pain

Since 2017 is just around the corner, droves of people will be lacing up their running shoes to shed what was gained in 2016. Yep, come January 2nd everyone will love to run…until about January 15th. That is about how long it takes before shin splints or knee pain really kicks in.

First, I stand by the assertion that you should get fit to run, not the other way around. Whether you’re jogging or sprinting, a high level of strength is required throughout the ankles, knees, and hips. Running is an advanced exercise because it requires much more single-limb stability strength than most people have. Indeed, people that are relatively unfit would be much better off doing 200-300 fast, quarter squats with no additional load, spread over 15 minutes as their “cardio.”

But telling a guy or gal not to do something as simple, and seemingly effective, as running in the new year is a lesson in futility. Hundreds of thousands of people will start doing it in January, so I might as well outline the steps they can take to minimize joint stress.

Limit running to 20 minutes at first: It is tempting to go balls-to-the-wall at first in order to hasten fat loss, but that’s the quickest route to injury and pain. Most people want to start jogging 45-60 minutes in the new year, and unless you’ve been a consistent runner in late 2016, that’s a bad idea. Limit your duration of running to 20 minutes, every other day for the first few weeks. Also, run slower than you think you can go. When you’re out of shape it takes very little exercise to ramp up your metabolism and burn fat. Take advantage of it, and your joints will thank you.

Wear Hoka One shoes: All the technique and training advice will do little if your shoes are worn out, which causes faulty running mechanics. You can tell a lot about how people run by looking at their souls…er, I mean, soles. Do you see considerable wear on the corners? If so, it’s time to get a new pair. I suggest Hoka One running shoes since my clients favor them most.

Increase your step rate approximately 10%: Start by running at a pace that’s most natural for you, and then shorten your stride so you have to take about 10% more steps without slowing your speed. Research by Heiderscheit et al 2011 and Luedke et al 2016 demonstrate that a shorter stride length (i.e., increased step rate) will provide three benefits:

  • Less impact forces to the knees, shins, and hips.
  • Less impact forces that can cause knee valgus.
  • Greater metabolic demand while running.

So increasing your step rate will minimize stress to your joints and augment the amount of calories you burn while running. You can’t beat that combination.

Roll your plantar fascia with a lacrosse ball: Research by Novacheck 1998 demonstrates that stress forces within the plantar fascia can reach triple your body weight while running. Since that thick band of tissue on the bottom of each foot takes a real beating, spend a minute or so rolling each bare foot over a lacrosse ball before and after running to keep the plantar fascia supple and healthy. Furthermore, the bottom of each foot has 150,000 or more nerve endings that, when stimulated, can relieve tension throughout the hamstrings and low back.

Now you have four tips that will help you run pain-free well into the new year.

Stay Focused,
CW

How to Avoid Getting Sick

blog running in snow

Now that the new year is upon us, droves of people will start exercising. The holiday season is a time when people typically exercise less and eat more, so they double-down on training come January. Pair that with cold winter temperatures and plenty of germs crawling around and you’ve got the perfect environment to get sick – or do you?

Some types of exercise can positively or negatively affect your likelihood of getting sick. Stress, exercise and illness can all affect the immune system so it’s important to have each in check. Continue reading

Squeeze More Muscle into Your Training

blog biceps squeeze Muscle growth requires tension. If you haven’t been gaining muscle, one likely culprit is a lack of high-threshold motor unit recruitment during your sets.

When the tension of your muscle contractions is too low, you’re not stimulating the muscle fibers that have the most growth potential.

This holds true for any muscle group.

However, the calves come to mind here since they’re one of the most notoriously stubborn muscle groups – if you chose the wrong parents. In Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Encyclopedia of Bodybuilding he mentioned that one of the ways he got his proportionally puny calves to grow was with super-heavy sets of incline leg press calf raises.

In essence, he forced his calves to produce more tension and they grew because of it. But you’ll quickly run into a wall of fatigue and joint strain if you only add weight to your exercises.

There’s a simpler, safer and more effective way to get more tension and growth out of your sets: the squeeze. Continue reading