Ultimate Glute Development

Everyone wants better glutes, whether you’re a guy or gal, athlete or non-athlete. That’s because glutes that are awesomely developed not only make your body look better, but they can also drastically improve your performance. When the glutes are strengthened and built using the correct combinations of exercises, you’ll run faster, jump higher and improve the strength of all your lower-body lifts.

In order to build a muscle to it’s highest level of size and performance, all of its fibers should be recruited by the end of a workout. The glutes are a tri-planar muscle, which means it can function in all three planes of movement:

  • Sagittal plane = hip extension
  • Frontal plane = hip abduction
  • Transverse plane = hip external rotation

The problem is that most people only train the sagittal plane function of the glutes: hip extension. I’m talking here about the typical squat, deadlift and lunge variations.

Last fall I spent four months working with Christopher Powers, Ph.D., at his Movement Performance Institute (a glute-focused sports medicine facility if there ever was one). I worked with athletes and non-athletes that had a myriad of knee, low back or hip problems.

The early stages of Professor Powers’ system focuses heavily on strengthening the glutes in the frontal and transverse planes – hip abduction and hip external rotation, respectively. Pure hip extension isn’t usually trained until about 6 weeks into the system.

There were two key observations I made after training athletes primarily in hip abduction and external rotation for up to 6 weeks straight:

  • Their glutes got substantially larger
  • Their hip extension strength increased

Their glutes got bigger because they were recruiting muscle fibers that perform hip abduction and external rotation, which had been neglected in the gym from doing nothing but squats, lunges and deadlifts.

Prof. Powers has been a pioneer in research that demonstrates a link between frequent glute activation and a stronger mind-muscle connection, which is an essential component of strength and hypertrophy development. So even though pure hip extension wasn’t trained, that movement got stronger because the brain was better able to recruit the entire gluteal fibers in any future task.

My point here is that ultimate glute development requires a strong emphasis on hip abduction and hip external rotation. Those two movement planes must be frequently trained in order to build the glutes to the highest level of size and performance.

Test Yourself

Before you watch the video where I outline my favorite 7-minute glute-building sequence, test yourself (or one of your clients).

  • Stiff hamstrings? Do a standing toe touch assessment, then perform the glute sequence and immediately retest it.
  • Knee or low back pain? Do a movement which causes you to feel the discomfort, then perform the glute sequence and immediately retest it.
  • Need to improve your squat, lunge, deadlift, sprint or vertical jump? Do the following sequence twice each day for 2 weeks, then retest the exercise you’re trying to improve. Your performance will definitely go up!

The following Ultimate Glute Development sequence requires a mini-band. I use the bands made by Perform Better, which can be found at this Amazon link. Most females should start with a yellow mini-band; males can start with a green. The key is to progress the band tension as your strength improves.

  • Goal for males: perform the entire Ultimate Glute Development sequence with a black Perform Better mini-band.
  • Goal for females: perform the entire Ultimate Glute Development sequence with a blue Perform Better mini-band.

Here’s the Ultimate Glute Development sequence, a collection of my favorite glute-building exercises, all crammed into a 7-minute drill. Do this sequence at least once per day (preferably twice), at the beginning of your regular workouts or as a stand-alone drill.

I highly recommend you make this a foundational activation sequence for you and your clients, for years to come.

Stay Focused,
CW

Get Your Feet in Control

The human foot is a marvel of complex engineering. Each one is made up of 26 bones, 33 joints and over 100 soft tissue structures that form muscles, tendons and ligaments. Not to mention the 150,000 nerve endings that you have on the bottom of each foot.

Your body needs all of those components to be working at full capacity in order to achieve an impressive vertical jump, sprint or deadlift. But more often than not, your feet have lost that ability, and the negative consequences can be far-reaching. Indeed, progressive doctors that specialize in treating jaw disorders (e.g., TMJ) look at the patient’s foot posture and control when designing a treatment plan.

Many active people take up to 10,000 steps per day. Pair that with the fact that most people don’t wear properly-fitted shoes, or have stiffness in one or more of the 33 joints, and you’ve got a perfect scenario for lousy foot mechanics that can cause ankle, knee, low back or the previously mentioned jaw pain.

Shoes are often the culprit, because they impair isolated action of each toe. And if you wear high heels or cowboy boots, the situation becomes exponentially worse because your toes are crammed together like clowns in a compact car during a Shriner’s parade. This results in poor motor control of your feet – essentially, your feet become “dumb” since your brain loses the ability to effectively control their joints and soft tissues.

Test Yourself

Here’s a simple, basic test to determine if you have adequate motor control of your feet. Stand barefoot with your feet shoulder width apart. Can you lift the big toe without elevating the other four toes? Can you elevate the four smaller toes while the big toe remains on the ground?

If you weren’t able to pass the test, your feet lack the motor control they need. Practice this drill throughout the day while seated, and then progress to the standing version since it’s more challenging. It will probably take a few weeks to get it right, and at first you might need to use a free hand to hold down the toe(s) that should remain static.

The next step is to focus on the shoe dilemma. Remember, regular shoes will keep your toes from moving freely. The solution is to wear toe socks, which isolate the toes so your brain can reconnect with each one. You can find them on Amazon at this link.

And for the times when you want to walk or lounge around the house barefoot, you can find rubber toe spreaders on Amazon at this link.

Now you have a simple way to test, and improve the motor control of your feet. And when you don’t feel like practicing the motor control drill, be sure to wear toe socks or rubber toe spreaders so your toes can come back to life. Your ankles, knees, low back – and maybe even your jaw – will reap the rewards.

Stay Focused,
CW